Losing your case? Dative experiencers in Mexican Spanish and heritage speakers in the United States

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

This chapter examines the gradual loss of dative case marking with dative experiencer verbs among Spanish heritage speakers of Mexican-American origin, first generation adult immigrants from Mexico, and two control groups of Spanish native speakers from Mexico tested in Mexico. According to the results of the written production task, heritage speakers and adult immigrants tend to omit the “a” with gustar-type verbs whereas the native speakers from Mexico do not omit a-marking in written production. Interestingly all bilingual groups, and even several native speakers from Mexico accepted ungrammatical sentences without a-marking in the acceptability judgment task. These results suggest that the erosion of dative case marking with dative experiencer subjects is a tendency already present in the monolingual variety. Although incomplete acquisition and attrition due to insufficient input and use may lead to an eventually different grammar in first and second generation immigrants, the results of this study support the claim that a language contact situation accelerates changes already in progress in monolingual varieties (Silva-Corvalán, 1994). ungrammatical sentences without a-marking in the acceptability judgment task
Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAdvances in Spanish as a Heritage Language
EditorsDiego Pascual y Cabo
PublisherJohn Benjamins
Pages99-124
ISBN (Electronic)9789027266873
ISBN (Print)9789027241917
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 11 2016

Publication series

NameStudies in Bilingualism
Volume49

Fingerprint

Mexico
immigrant
first generation
erosion
grammar
Group
contact
language

Cite this

Montrul, S. A. (2016). Losing your case? Dative experiencers in Mexican Spanish and heritage speakers in the United States. In D. Pascual y Cabo (Ed.), Advances in Spanish as a Heritage Language (pp. 99-124). (Studies in Bilingualism; Vol. 49). John Benjamins. https://doi.org/10.1075/sibil.49.06mon

Losing your case? Dative experiencers in Mexican Spanish and heritage speakers in the United States. / Montrul, Silvina A.

Advances in Spanish as a Heritage Language. ed. / Diego Pascual y Cabo. John Benjamins, 2016. p. 99-124 (Studies in Bilingualism; Vol. 49).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Montrul, SA 2016, Losing your case? Dative experiencers in Mexican Spanish and heritage speakers in the United States. in D Pascual y Cabo (ed.), Advances in Spanish as a Heritage Language. Studies in Bilingualism, vol. 49, John Benjamins, pp. 99-124. https://doi.org/10.1075/sibil.49.06mon
Montrul SA. Losing your case? Dative experiencers in Mexican Spanish and heritage speakers in the United States. In Pascual y Cabo D, editor, Advances in Spanish as a Heritage Language. John Benjamins. 2016. p. 99-124. (Studies in Bilingualism). https://doi.org/10.1075/sibil.49.06mon
Montrul, Silvina A. / Losing your case? Dative experiencers in Mexican Spanish and heritage speakers in the United States. Advances in Spanish as a Heritage Language. editor / Diego Pascual y Cabo. John Benjamins, 2016. pp. 99-124 (Studies in Bilingualism).
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