Looking for the source of the Simon effect: Evidence of multiple codes

Alejandro Lleras, Cathleen M. Moore, J. Toby Mordkoff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The Simon effect (SE) usually is described as the performance advantage that results when a target and its associated response share the same spatial code, as opposed to when they do not, even when the target's spatial code is task-irrelevant. To some, this task-irrelevant code represents the location of the target with respect to the participant (Simon & Craft, 1970), whereas to others (Umiltà & Nicoletti, 1992) it represents the location of the target with respect to the locus of attention. By using a spatial cuing procedure, we simultaneously tested both of these hypotheses and found evidence that both types of codes produce independent SEs, therefore providing evidence that multiple spatial codes can simultaneously influence performance in a Simon task.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)531-542
Number of pages12
JournalAmerican Journal of Psychology
Volume117
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2004
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

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