Long-term retention of skilled visual search: Do young adults retain more than old adults?

A. D. Fisk, C. Hertzog, M. D. Lee, W. A. Rogers, M. Anderson-Garlach

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Young and old Ss received extensive consistent-mapping visual search practice (3,000 trials). The Ss returned to the laboratory following a 16-month retention interval. Retention of skilled visual search was assessed using the trained stimuli (assessment of retention of stimulus-specific learning) and using new stimuli (assessment of retention of task-specific learning). All Ss, regardless of age group, demonstrated impressive retention. However, age-related retention differences favoring the young were observed when retention of stimulus-specific learning was assessed. No age-related retention differences were observed when task-specific learning was assessed. The data suggest that age-related retention capabilities depend on the type of learning assessed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)206-215
Number of pages10
JournalPsychology and aging
Volume9
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1994

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Aging
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

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