Long-term outcome of dogs treated with ulnar rollover transposition for limb-sparing of distal radial osteosarcoma: 27 limbs in 26 dogs

Bernard Séguin, Matthew D. O'Donnell, Peter J. Walsh, Laura E. Selmic

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To determine outcomes in dogs with distal radial osteosarcoma treated with ulnar rollover transposition (URT) limb-sparing surgery including: viability of the ulnar graft, complications, subjective limb function, disease-free interval (DFI), and survival time (ST). Study design: Retrospective case series. Animals: Twenty-six client-owned dogs with distal radial osteosarcoma and no involvement of the ulna. Methods: Data of dogs treated with URT were collected at the time of surgery and retrospectively from medical records and by contacting owners and referring veterinarians. Results: URT technique was performed on 27 limbs in 26 dogs. The ulnar graft was determined to be viable in 17 limbs, nonviable in 3, and unknown in 7. Complications occurred in 20 limbs. Infection was diagnosed in 12 limbs. Biomechanical complications occurred in 15 and local recurrence in 2 limbs. Limb function graded by veterinarians or owners was poor in 2 limbs, fair in 4, good in 14, excellent in 3, and unknown in 4. Median DFI was 245 days and median ST was 277 days. Conclusion: The URT technique maintained the viability of the ulnar graft. The complication rate was high but limb function appeared acceptable. Although sufficient length of the distal aspect of the ulna must be preserved to perform this technique, local recurrence was not increased compared to other limb-sparing techniques when cases were appropriately selected.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1017-1024
Number of pages8
JournalVeterinary Surgery
Volume46
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2017

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

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