Learning from digital video: An exploration of how interactions affect outcomes

Robb Lindgren, Roy Pea, Sarah Lewis, Joe Rosen

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The sinking costs of producing digital video and its growing presence on the Internet suggest that it has potential for use in web-based learning technologies. However, there have been few investigations into how the kind of interaction one has with video impacts subsequent learning. In this in-progress study participants are asked to watch video of an expert taking apart a toaster and describing how it works. The recorded event is the same for all participants, but the event is presented in one of three different modalities: (1) digital video shot from a free-standing camera (2) digital video shot from a free-standing camera that has been annotated in a video markup application called DIVER and (3) digital video shot from a head-mounted camera. A number of different assessment tasks are used to characterize the quantity and type of learning that is supported by a particular mode of video interaction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationCSCL 2007 - Computer Supported Collaborative Learning Conference 2007
Subtitle of host publicationMice, Minds, and Society
Pages444-446
Number of pages3
EditionPART 1
StatePublished - Dec 1 2007
Externally publishedYes
EventConference on Computer Supported Collaborative Learning: Of Mice, Minds, and Society, CSCL 2007 - New Brunswick, NJ, United States
Duration: Jul 16 2007Jul 21 2007

Publication series

NameComputer-Supported Collaborative Learning Conference, CSCL
NumberPART 1
Volume8
ISSN (Print)1573-4552

Other

OtherConference on Computer Supported Collaborative Learning: Of Mice, Minds, and Society, CSCL 2007
CountryUnited States
CityNew Brunswick, NJ
Period7/16/077/21/07

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Education

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