Latino children’s ability to interpret in health settings: A parent–child dyadic perspective on child health literacy

Lisa M. Guntzviller, Jakob D. Jensen, Luz Maria Carreno

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

To determine children’s ability to interpret in medical settings, 100 dyads of low-income, Spanish-speaking parents and their bilingual children who interpret for the parents were surveyed. Seventy-four children demonstrated adequate health literacy in English. Three theoretical perspectives (social cognitive theory, role-reversal theory, and the team-effort model) guided hypotheses about how parent and child characteristics influenced child health literacy. Structural equation model results supported the team-effort model. Children were more health literate when they were older, had better English abilities, had higher self-efficacy, and had parents with lower self-efficacy and better English language abilities. Children and parents may work as a team in medical interpreting settings, with children simultaneously compensating for and learning from parents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)143-163
Number of pages21
JournalCommunication Monographs
Volume84
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 3 2017

Keywords

  • Child interpreting
  • Latino
  • health literacy
  • language brokering
  • medical interpreting
  • parent–child relationship

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication
  • Language and Linguistics

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