Large-Scale Removal of Invasive Honeysuckle Decreases Mosquito and Avian Host Abundance

Allison M. Gardner, Ephantus Muturi, Leah D. Overmier, Brian F. Allan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Invasive species rank second only to habitat destruction as a threat to native biodiversity. One consequence of biological invasions is altered risk of exposure to infectious diseases in human and animal populations. The distribution and prevalence of mosquito-borne diseases depend on the complex interactions between the vector, the pathogen, and the human or wildlife reservoir host. These interactions are highly susceptible to disturbance by invasive species, including terrestrial plants. We conducted a 2-year field experiment using a Before–After/Control–Impact design to examine how removal of invasive Amur honeysuckle (Lonicera maackii) in a forest fragment embedded within a residential neighborhood affects the abundance of mosquitoes, including two of the most important vectors of West Nile virus, Culex pipiens and Cx. restuans. We also assessed any potential changes in avian communities and local microclimate associated with Amur honeysuckle removal. We found that (1) removal of Amur honeysuckle reduces the abundance of both vector and non-vector mosquito species that commonly feed on human hosts, (2) the abundance and composition of avian hosts is altered by honeysuckle removal, and (3) areas invaded with honeysuckle support local microclimates that are favorable to mosquito survival. Collectively, our investigations demonstrate the role of a highly invasive understory shrub in determining the abundance and distribution of mosquitoes and suggest potential mechanisms underlying this pattern. Our results also give rise to additional questions regarding the general impact of invasive plants on vector-borne diseases and the spatial scale at which removal of invasive plants may be utilized to effect disease control.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)750-761
Number of pages12
JournalEcoHealth
Volume14
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2017

Keywords

  • Conservation
  • Culex pipiens
  • Culex restuans
  • Invasive plants
  • Lonicera maackii
  • West Nile virus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

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