Laboratory Evaluation of Larvicidal and Oviposition Deterrent Properties of Edible Plant Oils for Potential Management of Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) in Drinking Water Containers

Teresia M. Njoroge, May R Berenbaum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) transmits several devastating arboviruses, including dengue, chikungunya, and Zika virus, making development of inexpensive and eco-friendly strategies for its control an urgent priority. We evaluated the lethality of 13 commonly used plant-derived edible oils against late-third instar Ae. aegypti and then tested the three most lethal oils for stage-specific differences in lethality. We also examined the effects of the most lethal (hempseed), moderately lethal (sunflower and peanut), and least lethal (olive) oils on survival to adulthood and oviposition behavior of gravid females. We hypothesized that the insecticidal activity of edible oils is a function of the content of their linoleic acid, a key fatty acid component with film-forming properties. Among the 13 oils tested, hempseed oil was the most lethal, with an LC50 of 348.25 ppm, followed by sesame (670.44 ppm) and pumpkinseed (826.91 ppm) oils. Oils with higher linoleic acid content were more lethal to larvae than those with low linoleic acid content. Furthermore, pure concentrated linoleic acid was more lethal to larvae compared to any edible oil. In comparison to early instars, late instars were more susceptible to hempseed, sunflower, peanut, and olive oils; these oils also acted as oviposition deterrents, with effective repellency ≥63%. The proportion of larvae surviving to adulthood was significantly reduced in hempseed, sunflower, peanut, and olive oil treatments relative to controls. Our results suggest that some edible plant oils have potential as effective, eco-friendly larvicides, and oviposition deterrents for controlling container-dwelling mosquitoes, especially in resource-limited settings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1055-1063
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of medical entomology
Volume56
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 27 2019

Fingerprint

oviposition deterrents
Oviposition
Edible Plants
plant fats and oils
Plant Oils
Aedes
Aedes aegypti
Culicidae
Diptera
Drinking Water
drinking water
containers
Oils
oils
Linoleic Acid
linoleic acid
olive oil
Larva
peanut oil
instars

Keywords

  • Aedes aegypti
  • edible plant oil
  • larvicidal
  • linoleic acid
  • oviposition deterrence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • veterinary(all)
  • Insect Science
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

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title = "Laboratory Evaluation of Larvicidal and Oviposition Deterrent Properties of Edible Plant Oils for Potential Management of Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) in Drinking Water Containers",
abstract = "The yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) transmits several devastating arboviruses, including dengue, chikungunya, and Zika virus, making development of inexpensive and eco-friendly strategies for its control an urgent priority. We evaluated the lethality of 13 commonly used plant-derived edible oils against late-third instar Ae. aegypti and then tested the three most lethal oils for stage-specific differences in lethality. We also examined the effects of the most lethal (hempseed), moderately lethal (sunflower and peanut), and least lethal (olive) oils on survival to adulthood and oviposition behavior of gravid females. We hypothesized that the insecticidal activity of edible oils is a function of the content of their linoleic acid, a key fatty acid component with film-forming properties. Among the 13 oils tested, hempseed oil was the most lethal, with an LC50 of 348.25 ppm, followed by sesame (670.44 ppm) and pumpkinseed (826.91 ppm) oils. Oils with higher linoleic acid content were more lethal to larvae than those with low linoleic acid content. Furthermore, pure concentrated linoleic acid was more lethal to larvae compared to any edible oil. In comparison to early instars, late instars were more susceptible to hempseed, sunflower, peanut, and olive oils; these oils also acted as oviposition deterrents, with effective repellency ≥63{\%}. The proportion of larvae surviving to adulthood was significantly reduced in hempseed, sunflower, peanut, and olive oil treatments relative to controls. Our results suggest that some edible plant oils have potential as effective, eco-friendly larvicides, and oviposition deterrents for controlling container-dwelling mosquitoes, especially in resource-limited settings.",
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author = "Njoroge, {Teresia M.} and Berenbaum, {May R}",
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T1 - Laboratory Evaluation of Larvicidal and Oviposition Deterrent Properties of Edible Plant Oils for Potential Management of Aedes aegypti (Diptera

T2 - Culicidae) in Drinking Water Containers

AU - Njoroge, Teresia M.

AU - Berenbaum, May R

PY - 2019/6/27

Y1 - 2019/6/27

N2 - The yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) transmits several devastating arboviruses, including dengue, chikungunya, and Zika virus, making development of inexpensive and eco-friendly strategies for its control an urgent priority. We evaluated the lethality of 13 commonly used plant-derived edible oils against late-third instar Ae. aegypti and then tested the three most lethal oils for stage-specific differences in lethality. We also examined the effects of the most lethal (hempseed), moderately lethal (sunflower and peanut), and least lethal (olive) oils on survival to adulthood and oviposition behavior of gravid females. We hypothesized that the insecticidal activity of edible oils is a function of the content of their linoleic acid, a key fatty acid component with film-forming properties. Among the 13 oils tested, hempseed oil was the most lethal, with an LC50 of 348.25 ppm, followed by sesame (670.44 ppm) and pumpkinseed (826.91 ppm) oils. Oils with higher linoleic acid content were more lethal to larvae than those with low linoleic acid content. Furthermore, pure concentrated linoleic acid was more lethal to larvae compared to any edible oil. In comparison to early instars, late instars were more susceptible to hempseed, sunflower, peanut, and olive oils; these oils also acted as oviposition deterrents, with effective repellency ≥63%. The proportion of larvae surviving to adulthood was significantly reduced in hempseed, sunflower, peanut, and olive oil treatments relative to controls. Our results suggest that some edible plant oils have potential as effective, eco-friendly larvicides, and oviposition deterrents for controlling container-dwelling mosquitoes, especially in resource-limited settings.

AB - The yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) transmits several devastating arboviruses, including dengue, chikungunya, and Zika virus, making development of inexpensive and eco-friendly strategies for its control an urgent priority. We evaluated the lethality of 13 commonly used plant-derived edible oils against late-third instar Ae. aegypti and then tested the three most lethal oils for stage-specific differences in lethality. We also examined the effects of the most lethal (hempseed), moderately lethal (sunflower and peanut), and least lethal (olive) oils on survival to adulthood and oviposition behavior of gravid females. We hypothesized that the insecticidal activity of edible oils is a function of the content of their linoleic acid, a key fatty acid component with film-forming properties. Among the 13 oils tested, hempseed oil was the most lethal, with an LC50 of 348.25 ppm, followed by sesame (670.44 ppm) and pumpkinseed (826.91 ppm) oils. Oils with higher linoleic acid content were more lethal to larvae than those with low linoleic acid content. Furthermore, pure concentrated linoleic acid was more lethal to larvae compared to any edible oil. In comparison to early instars, late instars were more susceptible to hempseed, sunflower, peanut, and olive oils; these oils also acted as oviposition deterrents, with effective repellency ≥63%. The proportion of larvae surviving to adulthood was significantly reduced in hempseed, sunflower, peanut, and olive oil treatments relative to controls. Our results suggest that some edible plant oils have potential as effective, eco-friendly larvicides, and oviposition deterrents for controlling container-dwelling mosquitoes, especially in resource-limited settings.

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KW - linoleic acid

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