LABOR AND NET ENERGY EFFECTS OF RETROFITTING CEILING INSULATION IN SINGLE-FAMILY HOMES.

Charlotte Ford, Bruce Hannon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Improving the thermal efficiency of homes has been widely publicized as an important energy saver. This study examines in detail the net energy and labor implications of retrofitting single-family homes in the United States with ceiling insulation, a nationwide conservation effort that is well underway. Calculations are made of the energy savings realizable through the insulation of ceilings that were underinsulated in 1975. The resulting effects on labor demands and energy use in the insulation industries and throughout the economy are then analyzed, both during the retrofit process and after the homes were insulated. It is concluded that after the transitional effects pass, there could be a long-term primary energy savings of 0. 36 quads per year (worth 770 million in 1976) and a net increase in the labor force of 28,000 jobs. The results of this study are claimed to be important, for they show the trade-off effects within the United States economy of energy conservation measures versus the development of new energy sources.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)217-237
Number of pages21
JournalEnergy systems and policy
Volume4
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jan 1 1980
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

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