Ixodes scapularis (Acari

Ixodidae) distribution surveys in the Chicago metropolitan region

Jennifer Rydzewski, Nohra E Mateus-Pinilla, Richard E. Warner, Jeffrey A. Nelson, Tom C. Velat

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Considering recent studies confirming an increased risk of contracting Lyme disease near metropolitan Chicago, we surveyed a more comprehensive area to assess whether the geographical distribution and establishment of Ixodes scapularis (Say) populations across northeast Illinois are widespread or limited in occurrence. From May through October 2008 and from April through October 2009, 602 I. scapularis ticks of all three life stages (larva, nymph, adult) were collected from sites in Cook, DuPage, Lake, and McHenry counties in northeast Illinois. The surveys were conducted by drag sampling vegetation in public-access forested areas. I. scapularis comprised 56.4% of ticks collected (n = 1,067) at 17 of 32 survey sites. In addition, four other tick species were incidentally collected: Dermacentor variabilis (Say), Haemaphysalis leporispalustris (Packard), Ixodes dentatus (Marx), and Amblyomma americanum (L.). This study updates the I. scapularis distribution in northeast Illinois. Our random sampling of suitable tick habitats across a large geographic area of the Chicago metropolitan area suggests a widespread human exposure to I. scapularis, and, potentially, to their associated pathogens throughout the region. These results prompt continued monitoring and investigation of the distribution, emergence, and expansion of I. scapularis populations and Borrelia burgdorferi transmission within this heavily populated region of Illinois.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)955-959
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of medical entomology
Volume49
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2012

Fingerprint

Ixodidae
Ixodes
Ixodes scapularis
Acari
Ticks
ticks
Ixodes dentatus
Haemaphysalis leporispalustris
Dermacentor variabilis
Amblyomma americanum
Dermacentor
Lyme disease
Borrelia burgdorferi
Nymph
Lyme Disease
nymphs
Lakes
Surveys and Questionnaires
geographical distribution
Population

Keywords

  • Chicago metropolitan area
  • Ixodes scapularis
  • Lyme disease
  • tick

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • veterinary(all)
  • Insect Science
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Ixodes scapularis (Acari : Ixodidae) distribution surveys in the Chicago metropolitan region. / Rydzewski, Jennifer; Mateus-Pinilla, Nohra E; Warner, Richard E.; Nelson, Jeffrey A.; Velat, Tom C.

In: Journal of medical entomology, Vol. 49, No. 4, 01.07.2012, p. 955-959.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Rydzewski, Jennifer ; Mateus-Pinilla, Nohra E ; Warner, Richard E. ; Nelson, Jeffrey A. ; Velat, Tom C. / Ixodes scapularis (Acari : Ixodidae) distribution surveys in the Chicago metropolitan region. In: Journal of medical entomology. 2012 ; Vol. 49, No. 4. pp. 955-959.
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