It's all about control: The role of self-control in buffering the effects of negative reciprocity beliefs and trait anger on workplace deviance

Simon Lloyd D. Restubog, Patrick Raymund James M. Garcia, Lu Wang, David Cheng

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Drawing upon the general aggression model, general theory of crime, and the integrative cognitive model of trait anger, we examined the role of self-control in buffering the effects of negative reciprocity beliefs and trait anger on workplace deviance. A total of 125 employees participated in the study. Results supported the hypothesized direct effects of negative reciprocity beliefs, trait anger, and self-control on archival data on workplace deviance. In addition, self-control moderated these relationships. Specifically, there was a weaker positive relationship between negative reciprocity beliefs, trait anger and workplace deviance for employees with high as opposed to low levels of self-control. These findings supported the view that self-control can override predispositions to engage in deviant behaviors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)655-660
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Research in Personality
Volume44
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Anger
Workplace
Crime
Aggression
Self-Control

Keywords

  • Aggression
  • Individual differences
  • Negative reciprocity
  • Self-control
  • Trait anger

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

It's all about control : The role of self-control in buffering the effects of negative reciprocity beliefs and trait anger on workplace deviance. / Restubog, Simon Lloyd D.; Garcia, Patrick Raymund James M.; Wang, Lu; Cheng, David.

In: Journal of Research in Personality, Vol. 44, No. 5, 01.10.2010, p. 655-660.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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