Iterative modeling and identification of a CO2 air conditioning system

Bryan P. Rasmussen, Andrew G Alleyne, Andrew Musser

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

This paper uses an air conditioning system to illustrate the benefits of iteratively combining first principles and system identification techniques to develop control-oriented models of complex systems. A transcritical vapor compression system is initially modeled with first principles and then verified with experimental data. Both SISO and MIMO system identification techniques are then used to construct locally linear models. Motivated by the ability to capture the salient dynamic characteristics with low order identified models, the physical model is evaluated for essentially nonminimal dynamics. A singular perturbation model reduction approach is then applied to obtain a minimal representation of the dynamics more suitable for control design, and yielding insight to the underl ing system dynamics previously unavailable in the literature. The results demonstrate that iteratively modeling a complex system with first principles and system identification techniques gives greater confidence in the first principles model, and better understanding of the underlying physical dynamics. Although this iterative process requires more time and effort, significant insight and model improvements can be realized.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages813-820
Number of pages8
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2004
Event2004 ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, IMECE - Anaheim, CA, United States
Duration: Nov 13 2004Nov 19 2004

Other

Other2004 ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, IMECE
CountryUnited States
CityAnaheim, CA
Period11/13/0411/19/04

Fingerprint

Air conditioning
Identification (control systems)
Large scale systems
MIMO systems
Dynamical systems
Vapors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Software

Cite this

Rasmussen, B. P., Alleyne, A. G., & Musser, A. (2004). Iterative modeling and identification of a CO2 air conditioning system. 813-820. Paper presented at 2004 ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, IMECE, Anaheim, CA, United States. https://doi.org/10.1115/IMECE2004-59591

Iterative modeling and identification of a CO2 air conditioning system. / Rasmussen, Bryan P.; Alleyne, Andrew G; Musser, Andrew.

2004. 813-820 Paper presented at 2004 ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, IMECE, Anaheim, CA, United States.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Rasmussen, BP, Alleyne, AG & Musser, A 2004, 'Iterative modeling and identification of a CO2 air conditioning system' Paper presented at 2004 ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, IMECE, Anaheim, CA, United States, 11/13/04 - 11/19/04, pp. 813-820. https://doi.org/10.1115/IMECE2004-59591
Rasmussen BP, Alleyne AG, Musser A. Iterative modeling and identification of a CO2 air conditioning system. 2004. Paper presented at 2004 ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, IMECE, Anaheim, CA, United States. https://doi.org/10.1115/IMECE2004-59591
Rasmussen, Bryan P. ; Alleyne, Andrew G ; Musser, Andrew. / Iterative modeling and identification of a CO2 air conditioning system. Paper presented at 2004 ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, IMECE, Anaheim, CA, United States.8 p.
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