Item-bundle DIF hypothesis testing: Identifying suspect bundles and assessing their differential functioning

Jeffrey A. Douglas, Louis A. Roussos, William F. Stout

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This article proposes two multidimensional IRT model-based methods of selecting item bundles (clusters of not necessarily adjacent items chosen according to some organizational principle) suspected of displaying DIF amplfication. The approach embodied in these two methods is inspired by Shealy and Stout's (1993a, 1993b) multidimensional model for DIF. Each bundle selected by these methods constitutes a DIF amplification hypothesis. When SIBTEST (Shealy & Stout, 1993b) confirms DIF amplification in selected bundles, differential bundle functioning (DBF) is said to occur. Three real data examples illustrate the two methods for suspect bundle selection. The effectiveness of the methods is argued on statistical grounds. A distinction between benign and adverse DIF is made. The decision whether flagged DIF items or DBF bundles display benign or adverse DIP/DBF must depend in part on nonstatistical construct validity arguments. Conducting DBF analyses using these methods should help in the identification of the causes of DIF/DBF.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)465-484
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of Educational Measurement
Volume33
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1996
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychology (miscellaneous)

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Item-bundle DIF hypothesis testing: Identifying suspect bundles and assessing their differential functioning'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this