Is there potential to adapt soybean (Glycine max Merr.) to future [CO2]? An analysis of the yield response of 18 genotypes in free-air CO2 enrichment

Kristen A. Bishop, Amy M. Betzelberger, Stephen P Long, Elizabeth Ainsworth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Rising atmospheric [CO2] is a uniform, global change that increases C3 photosynthesis and could offset some of the negative effects of global climate change on crop yields. Genetic variation in yield responsiveness to rising [CO2] would provide an opportunity to breed more responsive crop genotypes. A multi-year study of 18 soybean (Glycine maxMerr.) genotypes was carried out to identify variation in responsiveness to season-long elevated [CO2] (550ppm) under fully open-air replicated field conditions. On average across 18 genotypes, elevated [CO2] stimulated total above-ground biomass by 22%, but seed yield by only 9%, in part because most genotypes showed a reduction in partitioning of energy to seeds. Over four years of study, there was consistency from year to year in the genotypes that were most and least responsive to elevated [CO2], suggesting heritability of CO2 response. Further analysis of six genotypes did not reveal a photosynthetic basis for the variation in yield response. Although partitioning to seed was decreased, cultivars with the highest partitioning coefficient in current [CO2] also had the highest partitioning coefficient in elevated [CO2]. The results show the existence of genetic variation in soybean response to elevated [CO2], which is needed to breed soybean to the future atmospheric environment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1765-1774
Number of pages10
JournalPlant, Cell and Environment
Volume38
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2015

Fingerprint

Soybeans
Glycine max
carbon dioxide
Air
Genotype
soybeans
air
genotype
Seeds
Climate Change
Photosynthesis
Biomass
Glycine
Glycine (Fabaceae)
C3 photosynthesis
breeds
genetic variation
global change
seeds
aboveground biomass

Keywords

  • Atmospheric change
  • Biomass partitioning
  • Climate change
  • Crop development
  • Crop yield
  • Food security
  • Global change
  • Harvest index

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Plant Science

Cite this

Is there potential to adapt soybean (Glycine max Merr.) to future [CO2]? An analysis of the yield response of 18 genotypes in free-air CO2 enrichment. / Bishop, Kristen A.; Betzelberger, Amy M.; Long, Stephen P; Ainsworth, Elizabeth.

In: Plant, Cell and Environment, Vol. 38, No. 9, 01.09.2015, p. 1765-1774.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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