Is the Selectivity Hypothesis Still Relevant? A Review of Gendered Persuasion and Processing of Advertising Messages

Michelle R. Nelson, Alexandra M. Vilela

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

These descriptions of the focus (self vs. other) and the way that men and women process information sound like the predictions made from the selectivity hypothesis, proposed and tested by Meyers-Levy (1988) more than 20 years ago. The selectivity hypothesis is the most influential theoretical framework related to persuasion and gender (Kempf, Laczniak, & Smith, 2006). It suggests that gender may be an important variable for understanding how men and women respond to communication efforts based on their gender roles (culturally derived behaviors and activities associated with masculinity or femininity that individuals choose to adopt; Palan, 2001).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationGender, Culture, and Consumer Behavior
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Pages111-138
Number of pages28
ISBN (Electronic)9781136463495
ISBN (Print)9781848729469
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Economics, Econometrics and Finance(all)
  • General Business, Management and Accounting
  • General Social Sciences
  • General Psychology

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