Is Ethnic Identity a Buffer? Exploring the Relations Between Racial Microaggressions and Depressive Symptoms Among Asian-American Individuals

Shinwoo Choi, Jioni A. Lewis, Stacy Harwood, Ruby Mendenhall, Margaret Browne Huntt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study explores the moderating role of ethnic identity in the relations between racial microaggressions and depressive symptoms. Using survey data from 353 Asian-American college students, we found that racial microaggressions significantly predicted depressive symptoms and accounted for 24% of the variance in a hierarchical multiple regression analysis. In addition, ethnic identity moderated the relations between racial microaggressions and depressive symptoms. Thus, ethnic identity buffers Asian-Americans against the negative mental health effects of racial microaggressions. Implications for research and practice in the field of social work are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)18-29
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Ethnic and Cultural Diversity in Social Work
Volume26
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2 2017

Keywords

  • Asian-American and Pacific Islanders population
  • immigrants and refugees
  • mental health or community mental health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Education

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