Investigation of liquid CO2 sequestration and EOR in low temperature oil reservoirs in the Illinois Basin

Scott M. Frailey, John P. Grube, Beverly Seyler, Robert J. Finley

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Current studies of geologic storage of CO2, with the exception of CO2 sequestration in coal beds, focuses on supercritical CO2, emphasizing the stability of the fluid, solubility of CO2 in saline formation water and miscibility with crude oil. Likewise, with the exception of very early research, the use of CO2 to enhance oil recovery (EOR) historically focused on supercritical CO2 to achieve miscible conditions with crude oil. The only possibility of liquid CO2 geologic storage is in formations with temperatures less than the critical temperature of CO2. Due to the naturally occurring geothermal temperature gradient, most all geologic formations currently considered for CO2 sequestration and EOR exceed the TcCO2. A research plan has been developed to investigate the use of depleting (mature) oil reservoirs with formation temperatures less than critical temperature of CO2 to sequester liquid CO2 and investigate the implications of EOR from the liquid CO2 displacement process. Relatively higher pressures are required to attain liquid CO2, which translate to fracture gradients as high as 1.0 psi/ft. However, fracture stimulation data published in early literature and field data from fracture stimulation companies in the Illinois Basin show that fracture gradients of up to 1.0 psi/ft are commonly recorded in the shallower producing horizons of the Basin. Therefore, the pressure requirement may not be a detriment. Because of the liquid/gas phase changes and consequent changes in density and viscosity of CO2 at subcritical temperatures, low temperature oil reservoirs provide a unique opportunity for liquid CO2 storage and the application of a novel and innovative EOR-CO2 cyclic multi-reservoir displacement process within the Illinois Basin.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationSociety of Petroleum Engineers - SPE/DOE Symposium on Improved Oil Recovery 2004, IOR 2004
PublisherSociety of Petroleum Engineers (SPE)
ISBN (Print)9781555639884
StatePublished - Jan 1 2004
Externally publishedYes
EventSPE/DOE Symposium on Improved Oil Recovery 2004, IOR 2004 - Tulsa, United States
Duration: Apr 17 2004Apr 21 2004

Publication series

NameProceedings - SPE Symposium on Improved Oil Recovery
Volume2004-April

Other

OtherSPE/DOE Symposium on Improved Oil Recovery 2004, IOR 2004
CountryUnited States
CityTulsa
Period4/17/044/21/04

Fingerprint

carbon sequestration
Recovery
liquid
oil
Liquids
basin
temperature
Temperature
crude oil
Solubility
Crude oil
formation water
coal seam
Thermal gradients
temperature gradient
Oils
solubility
viscosity
Coal
Viscosity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Energy Engineering and Power Technology
  • Geotechnical Engineering and Engineering Geology

Cite this

Frailey, S. M., Grube, J. P., Seyler, B., & Finley, R. J. (2004). Investigation of liquid CO2 sequestration and EOR in low temperature oil reservoirs in the Illinois Basin. In Society of Petroleum Engineers - SPE/DOE Symposium on Improved Oil Recovery 2004, IOR 2004 (Proceedings - SPE Symposium on Improved Oil Recovery; Vol. 2004-April). Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE).

Investigation of liquid CO2 sequestration and EOR in low temperature oil reservoirs in the Illinois Basin. / Frailey, Scott M.; Grube, John P.; Seyler, Beverly; Finley, Robert J.

Society of Petroleum Engineers - SPE/DOE Symposium on Improved Oil Recovery 2004, IOR 2004. Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE), 2004. (Proceedings - SPE Symposium on Improved Oil Recovery; Vol. 2004-April).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Frailey, SM, Grube, JP, Seyler, B & Finley, RJ 2004, Investigation of liquid CO2 sequestration and EOR in low temperature oil reservoirs in the Illinois Basin. in Society of Petroleum Engineers - SPE/DOE Symposium on Improved Oil Recovery 2004, IOR 2004. Proceedings - SPE Symposium on Improved Oil Recovery, vol. 2004-April, Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE), SPE/DOE Symposium on Improved Oil Recovery 2004, IOR 2004, Tulsa, United States, 4/17/04.
Frailey SM, Grube JP, Seyler B, Finley RJ. Investigation of liquid CO2 sequestration and EOR in low temperature oil reservoirs in the Illinois Basin. In Society of Petroleum Engineers - SPE/DOE Symposium on Improved Oil Recovery 2004, IOR 2004. Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE). 2004. (Proceedings - SPE Symposium on Improved Oil Recovery).
Frailey, Scott M. ; Grube, John P. ; Seyler, Beverly ; Finley, Robert J. / Investigation of liquid CO2 sequestration and EOR in low temperature oil reservoirs in the Illinois Basin. Society of Petroleum Engineers - SPE/DOE Symposium on Improved Oil Recovery 2004, IOR 2004. Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE), 2004. (Proceedings - SPE Symposium on Improved Oil Recovery).
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