Investigation of a condenser-linked radiant cooling system using a heat balance based energy simulation program

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

Abstract

One of the more powerful benefits of us ing computer simulation in the process of designing buildings is the ability to try ideas that may not appear feasible on the surface but could potentially have some merit. This is especially true when investigating the energy consumption of buildings-computer simulation a/lows the architect and engineer to reasonably predict the energy consumption of a particular building and attempt to increase its efficiency or apply a particular technology to the design without actually constructing the building. Thus, ideas can be tried in the computer laboratory and results can fine tune the design and lead to more informed decisions and an integrated design process. One area where simulation has somewhat lagged available technology is radiant heating and cooling systems. Until recently, a radiant system model within a comprehensive energy analysis program that compares the results on the basis of equivalent thermal comfort with conventional forced air systems has not existed. With the release of the new U.S. Department of Energy building energy analysis program in April 2001, this has been partially resolved. Recent improvements to the program include the ability to linka radiant system directly to a cooling tower rather than a chilled water line. The focus of this study is the discussion of this improvement to the simulation program and a demonstration of how this technology might be used to reduce cooling costs in several climates, including those in which such a strategy would typically be dismissed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)647-655
Number of pages9
JournalASHRAE Transactions
Volume109
Issue numberPart 2
StatePublished - Nov 24 2003

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Cooling systems
Energy utilization
Radiant heating
Water piping systems
Cooling towers
Thermal comfort
Computer simulation
Demonstrations
Cooling
Engineers
Air
Hot Temperature
Costs

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Building and Construction
  • Mechanical Engineering

Cite this

Investigation of a condenser-linked radiant cooling system using a heat balance based energy simulation program. / Strand, Richard Karl.

In: ASHRAE Transactions, Vol. 109, No. Part 2, 24.11.2003, p. 647-655.

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

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