Investigating the role of psychological contract breach on career success: Convergent evidence from two longitudinal studies

Simon Lloyd D. Restubog, Prashant Bordia, Sarbari Bordia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The current study extends past research by examining leader-member exchange as a mediator of the relationship between employee reports of psychological contract breach and career success. In addition, we tested a competing perspective in which we proposed that performance mediators (i.e., in-role performance and organizational citizenship behaviors) will mediate the breach-career success relationship. Subjective and objective indicators of career success were assessed using supervisor-rated promotability and archival data on actual promotion decisions, respectively. In Sample 1, we found that supervisor-rated leader-member exchange (T1) mediated the relationship between breach (T1) and objective career success after 2. years. In sample 2, we replicated and extended these results using a three wave measurement over three years. Specifically, we found that leader-member exchange (T2) mediated the relationship between relational breach (T1) and subjective (T2) and objective (T3) career success. Performance-based mediators at T2 were no longer significant when regressed together with leader-member exchange and relational breach, ruling out alternative mediator explanations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)428-437
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Vocational Behavior
Volume79
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2011
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Career success
  • Employment relationships
  • Supervisor-subordinate relationships
  • Work-nonwork relationships
  • Workplace justice

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Applied Psychology
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

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