Investigating the lithospheric velocity structures beneath the Taiwan region by nonlinear joint inversion of local and teleseismic P wave data: Slab continuity and deflection

Hsin Hua Huang, Yih Min Wu, Xiaodong Song, Chien Hsin Chang, Hao Kuo-Chen, Shiann Jong Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The interaction between two flipping subduction systems shapes the complicated lithospheric structures and dynamics around the Taiwan region. Whether and in what form the Eurasian Plate subducts/deforms under Taiwan Island is critical to the debate of tectonic models. Although an east dipping high-velocity anomaly down to a depth below 200 km has been reported previously, its detailed morphology remains uncertain and leads to different interpretations. With a two-step strategy of nonlinear joint inversion, the slab images of the Eurasian Plate were retrieved in a geometry that is hyperthin in the south, becoming massive and steeper in the central, and severely deformed in the north. The possible depth and dimension of a slab break were also investigated through synthetic tests of whether the slab had torn. Moreover, the slab deflection found at ~23.2°N latitude seems to correspond to where the nonvolcanic tremors and recent NW-SE striking structures have occurred in southern Taiwan. Key Points High-resolution lithospheric images are retrieved by a two-step joint inversionThree-dimensional geometry of the east subducting slab under Taiwan is establishedA possible slab deflection is observed at around latitude 23.2°N

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)6350-6357
Number of pages8
JournalGeophysical Research Letters
Volume41
Issue number18
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 28 2014

Keywords

  • Taiwan orogeny
  • joint inversion
  • seismic tomography
  • seismotectonics
  • three-dimensional slab geometry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geophysics
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)

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