Investigating the aftershock of a disaster: A study of health service utilization and mental health symptoms in post-earthquake Nepal

Tara Powell, Shang Ju Li, Yuan Hsiao, Chloe Ettari, Anish Bhandari, Anne Peterson, Niva Shakya

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: In 2015, a 7.8 magnitude earthquake struck Nepal, causing unprecedented damage and loss in the mountain and hill regions of central Nepal. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between healthcare access and utilization, and post-disaster mental health symptoms. Methods: A cross-sectional study conducted with 750 disaster-affected individuals in six districts in central Nepal 15 months post-earthquake. Anxiety and depression were measured through the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS-21). Healthcare utilization questions examined types of healthcare in the communities, utilization, and approachability of care providers. Univariate analyses, ANOVAs and Tobit regression were used. Results: Depression and anxiety symptoms were significantly higher for females and individuals between 40-50 years old. Those who utilized a district hospital had the lowest anxiety and depression scores. Participants who indicated medical shops were the most important source of health-related information had more anxiety and depression than those who used other services. Higher quality of healthcare was significantly associated with fewer anxiety and depressive symptoms. Conclusions: Mental health symptoms can last long after a disaster occurs. Access to quality mental health care in the primary health care settings is critical to help individuals and communities recover immediately and during the long-term recovery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number1369
JournalInternational journal of environmental research and public health
Volume16
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2 2019

Fingerprint

Earthquakes
Nepal
Mental Health Services
Disasters
Anxiety
Depression
Mental Health
Quality of Health Care
Delivery of Health Care
District Hospitals
Primary Health Care
Analysis of Variance
Cross-Sectional Studies
Health

Keywords

  • Access to care
  • Disaster
  • Healthcare utilization
  • Mental health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

Investigating the aftershock of a disaster : A study of health service utilization and mental health symptoms in post-earthquake Nepal. / Powell, Tara; Li, Shang Ju; Hsiao, Yuan; Ettari, Chloe; Bhandari, Anish; Peterson, Anne; Shakya, Niva.

In: International journal of environmental research and public health, Vol. 16, No. 8, 1369, 02.04.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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