Intimate Partner Violence Among Bisexual-Spectrum Cisgender Undergraduate Women and Their Heterosexual Counterparts: A Preliminary Investigation

Allyson M. Blackburn, Nicole E. Allen, Breana Griffin, Rachel C. Garthe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study examined intimate partner violence (IPV) and identity abuse (i.e., partner violence targeting someone’s sexual orientation) among bisexual-spectrum and heterosexual cisgender undergraduate women in relation to their mental health and academic adjustment. Participants were first- and second-year bisexual-spectrum (n = 81) and heterosexual (n = 243) undergraduate cisgender women at a large, public university in the Midwest. IPV was prevalent in the sample, but bisexual-spectrum cisgender women who had been in relationships were significantly more likely to report IPV than their heterosexual counterparts (77.44% vs. 44.44% respectively). Over half of bisexual-spectrum cisgender women in dating relationships reported identity abuse. Most participants that experienced identity abuse indicated the perpetrator was heterosexual and/or a cisgender man. Sexual orientation did not moderate the relationship between IPV and depression, anxiety, or negative academic adjustment outcomes. Universities should integrate education on LGBTQ oppressions into their primary prevention programs, while also continuing to bolster IPV prevention and intervention efforts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Bisexuality
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2024

Keywords

  • Bisexual
  • IPV
  • college
  • dating violence
  • identity abuse
  • university

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gender Studies
  • Cultural Studies

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