Intestinal permeability and absorption in dogs with traumatic injury

Elizabeth M. Streeter, Erika Zsombor-Murray, Kari E. Moore, John E. Rush, Jörg M. Steiner, Elizabeth A. Rozanski, Kathryn E. Michel, David A. Williams, Lisa M. Freeman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The objectives of this study were to assess the feasibility of using urinary recovery of sugars to evaluate intestinal permeability and absorption in dogs with traumatic injury and to determine if intestinal permeability and absorption are altered in dogs with traumatic injury. After a 6-hour fast, a sugar solution containing lactulose, rhamnose, 3-O-methyl-D-glucose, and xylose was administered via nasoesophageal tube. Unne was collected and quantitated over the 6-hour study period via closed collection urinary catheters. Urinary sugar recoveries were measured by high-pressure anion exchange liquid chromatography and pulsed amperometric detection. Urinary sugar recoveries in Lhe trauma group at 24, 48, and 72 hours after trauma were compared to normal controls. In addition, severity of trauma was compared to urinary sugar recoveries. Twelve client-owned dogs with traumatic injury and 6 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. Lactulose recovery and the lactulose:rhamnose recovery ratio were significantly higher in the trauma group at 48 hours but were no longer different from controls by 72 hours. Xylose recovery was significantly higher in the trauma group when compared to controls at 72 hours, whereas 3-O-methyl-D-glucose recovery was significantly lower in the trauma group at 24 hours. The xylose: 3-O-methyl-D-glucose ratio was higher in the trauma group at all time points. Significant correlation was found between severity of trauma and xylose and 3-O-methyl-D-glucose recoveries 24 hours after injury. Results of this study support the hypothesis that intestinal permeability and absorption are altered in dogs with traumatic injury.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)669-673
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of veterinary internal medicine
Volume16
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002

Keywords

  • Canine
  • Gastrointestinal
  • Lactulose
  • Rhamnose
  • Trauma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

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