Interparental Conflict, Parenting Behavior, and Children's Friendship Quality as Correlates of Peer Aggression and Peer Victimization Among Aggressor/Victim Subgroups in South Korea

Jung Hee Shin, Jun Sung Hong, Jina Yoon, Dorothy L Espelage

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The focus of this study was to examine whether interparental conflict, maternal parenting behaviors, and children's friendship quality varied as a function of peer aggression/victim subgroups among a sample of 227 elementary school children and their mothers in South Korea. Both self-report and peer-report data indicated that the majority of the students were uninvolved in peer aggression situations, and the number of participants in the subgroups (aggressors, victims, and aggressor-victims) varied depending on the source of report. According to the self-report data, victims and aggressor-victims reported a higher level of maternal rejection than uninvolved youth. Aggressors, victims, and aggressor-victims reported higher maternal neglect than uninvolved youth. The highest level of interparental conflict was reported by victims, followed by aggressors. Interestingly, no significant differences were found in positive functioning of friendship quality among the subgroups, although results indicated a significant difference among groups in negative friendship quality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1933-1952
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of Interpersonal Violence
Volume29
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2014

Keywords

  • aggression
  • children
  • friendship
  • interparental conflict
  • parenting behavior

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Applied Psychology

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