Interactive effects of elevated CO 2 and temperature on water transport in ponderosa pine

H. Maherali, E. H. DeLucia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Many studies report that water flux through trees declines in response to elevated CO 2 , but this response may be modified by exposure to increased temperatures. To determine whether elevated CO 2 and temperature interact to affect hydraulic conductivity, we grew ponderosa pine seedlings for 24 wk in growth chambers with one of four atmospheric CO 2 concentrations (350, 550, 750, and 1100 ppm) and either a low (15°C nights, 25°C days) or high (20°C nights, 30°C days) temperature treatment. Vapor pressure deficits were also higher in the elevated temperature treatment. Seedling biomass increased with CO 2 concentration but was not affected by temperature. Root: shoot ratio was unaffected by CO 2 and temperature. Leaf: sapwood area ratio (A(L)/A(S)) declined in response to elevated temperature but was not influenced by CO 2 . Larger tracheid diameters at elevated temperature caused an increase in xylem-specific hydraulic conductivity (K(S)). The increase in K(S) and decrease in A(L)/A(S) led to higher leaf-specific hydraulic conductivity (K(L)) at elevated temperature. Stomatal conductance (g(S)) was correlated with K(L) across all treatments. Neither K(S), K(L), nor g(S) were affected by elevated CO 2 concentrations. High K(L) in response to elevated temperature may support increased transpiration or reduce the incidence of xylem cavitation in ponderosa pine in future, warmer climates.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)243-249
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican journal of botany
Volume87
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000

Fingerprint

Pinus ponderosa
Carbon Monoxide
Temperature
Water
temperature
water
hydraulic conductivity
Xylem
xylem
Seedlings
effect
seedling
Vapor Pressure
root-shoot ratio
seedlings
cavitation
sapwood
root shoot ratio
stomatal conductance
vapor pressure

Keywords

  • Biomass allocation
  • CO
  • Hydraulic conductivity
  • Leaf:sapwood area ratio
  • Pinaceae
  • Pinus ponderosa
  • Stomatal conductance
  • Temperature
  • Xylem anatomy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Genetics
  • Plant Science

Cite this

Interactive effects of elevated CO 2 and temperature on water transport in ponderosa pine . / Maherali, H.; DeLucia, E. H.

In: American journal of botany, Vol. 87, No. 2, 01.01.2000, p. 243-249.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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