Abstract

We aim to take 'lab-on-chip' technology further by introducing the concept of a 'lab-on-transistor'. In this methodology, laboratory operations, such as heating, cell lysis, and detection, are performed on a single transistor instead of on an entire microchip. To demonstrate this concept, we developed a heating technique that allows transistors to act as electrically addressable, individual heating units. We have coupled the transistor heaters with placement of sub-nanoliter droplets to create individual heated reaction volumes. Under this configuration transistors become highly localized heater/sensors capable of high-speed thermocycling (>25°C/s) of <1nL reactions with potential for electrical detection of biological analytes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 16th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences, MicroTAS 2012
PublisherChemical and Biological Microsystems Society
Pages1945-1947
Number of pages3
ISBN (Print)9780979806452
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012
Event16th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences, MicroTAS 2012 - Okinawa, Japan
Duration: Oct 28 2012Nov 1 2012

Publication series

NameProceedings of the 16th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences, MicroTAS 2012

Other

Other16th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences, MicroTAS 2012
CountryJapan
CityOkinawa
Period10/28/1211/1/12

Keywords

  • Denaturation
  • Droplets
  • Electroporation
  • Field effect transistor
  • Parallel
  • PCR

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemical Engineering (miscellaneous)
  • Bioengineering

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