Insult, Aggression, and the Southern Culture of Honor: An "Experimental Ethnography"

Dov Cohen, Brian F. Bowdle, Richard E. Nisbett, Norbert Schwarz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Three experiments examined how norms characteristic of a "culture of honor" manifest themselves in the cognitions, emotions, behaviors, and physiological reactions of southern White males. Participants were University of Michigan students who grew up in the North or South. In 3 experiments, they were insulted by a confederate who bumped into the participant and called him an "asshole." Compared with northerners - who were relatively unaffected by the insult - southerners were (a) more likely to think their masculine reputation was threatened, (b) more upset (as shown by a rise in cortisol levels), (c) more physiologically primed for aggression (as shown by a rise in testosterone levels), (d) more cognitively primed for aggression, and (e) more likely to engage in aggressive and dominant behavior. Findings highlight the insult-aggression cycle in cultures of honor, in which insults diminish a man's reputation and he tries to restore his status by aggressive or violent behavior.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)945-960
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of personality and social psychology
Volume70
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1996

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Cultural Anthropology
Aggression
honor
aggression
ethnography
reputation
experiment
Cognition
Hydrocortisone
Testosterone
cognition
Emotions
emotion
Students
student

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Insult, Aggression, and the Southern Culture of Honor : An "Experimental Ethnography". / Cohen, Dov; Bowdle, Brian F.; Nisbett, Richard E.; Schwarz, Norbert.

In: Journal of personality and social psychology, Vol. 70, No. 5, 05.1996, p. 945-960.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cohen, Dov ; Bowdle, Brian F. ; Nisbett, Richard E. ; Schwarz, Norbert. / Insult, Aggression, and the Southern Culture of Honor : An "Experimental Ethnography". In: Journal of personality and social psychology. 1996 ; Vol. 70, No. 5. pp. 945-960.
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