Inheritance of male courtship behavior, aggressive success, and body size in Drosophila silvestris

Christine R.B. Boake, Lyle Konigsberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We describe a combined phenotypic and quantitative genetic investigation of the traits that may contribute to reproductive success m the picture-winged fly, Drosophila silvestris. These were courtship behavior, aggressive success, and body size and shape. Behavioral tests were conducted on wild-caught sires and their laboratory-reared sons. Neither size, shape, nor aggressive success predicted mating success. In both generations, males that spent more tame courting and in wing-vibration were more likely to mate. However, components of courtship, overall aggressive success, and overall mating success had very low and nonsignificant heritabilities. The genetic estimates did not depend on whether they were based on males reared m both environments or reared only in the laboratory.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1487-1492
Number of pages6
JournalEvolution
Volume52
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1998
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Aggression
  • Courtship
  • Drosophila silvestris
  • Heritability
  • Sexual selection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Genetics
  • General Agricultural and Biological Sciences

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