Ingredient-wise study of flux characteristics in the ceramic membrane filtration of uncontaminated synthetic metalworking fluids, part 1: Experimental investigation of flux decline

Steven J. Skerlos, N. Rajagopalan, Richard E. DeVor, Shiv G. Kapoor, V. Don Angspatt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Membrane Filtration (MF) technology can remove microbes, particulates, and tramp oils that contaminate metalworking fluids (MWFs). Consequently MF has the potential to reduce health risks and extend MWF life in the machine tool industry. This research assesses the productivity of ceramic membrane filters during filtration of synthetic MWFs and examines the contribution of MWF chemical ingredients to productivity decline. The majority of the chemistry comprising typical synthetic MWFs has negligible impact on MF productivity. However, specialty additives such as lubricants, defoamers, and biocides can significantly reduce MF productivity. Results show that slight variations in formulation can dominate the productivity of the process. Specialty additives can also impart residual effects on the membrane that adversely impact productivity in subsequent applications of the ceramic membrane.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)739-745
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Manufacturing Science and Engineering, Transactions of the ASME
Volume122
Issue number4
StatePublished - Nov 2000

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Productivity
Fluids
Membranes
Ceramic membranes
Fluxes
Membrane technology
Biocides
Health risks
Machine tools
Lubricants
Industry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Control and Systems Engineering
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

Cite this

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