Ingestion of spinosad-containing toxic sugar bait alters Aedes albopictus vector competence and vectorial capacity for dengue virus

Abdullah A. Alomar, Bradley H. Eastmond, Zoi Rapti, Edward D. Walker, Barry W. Alto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Dengue virus (DENV) is a highly prevalent vector-borne virus that causes life-threatening illnesses to humans worldwide. The development of a tool to control vector populations has the potential to reduce the burden of DENV. Toxic sugar bait (TSB) provides a form of vector control that takes advantage of the sugar-feeding behavior of adult mosquitoes. However, studies on the effect of ingestion of toxins in TSB on vector competence and vectorial capacity for viruses are lacking. This study evaluated vector competence for DENV serotype-1 of Aedes albopictus at 7 and 14 days post-ingestion of TSB formulated with spinosad (of bacteria origin) as an oral toxin. Our results and others were modeled to estimate effects on Ae. albopictus vectorial capacity for DENV. Ingestion of TSB caused a reduction in survival of females, but increased mosquito susceptibility to DENV infection, disseminated infection, and transmission. However, this increase in vector competence was obviated by the reduction in survival, leading to a lower predicted vectorial capacity. The findings of this study highlight the importance of evaluating the net impact of TSB ingestion on epidemiological parameters of vectorial capacity in the context of vector control efforts to reduce the risk of transmission of vector-borne viruses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number933482
JournalFrontiers in Microbiology
Volume13
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 26 2022

Keywords

  • Aedes albopictus
  • dengue virus
  • survival
  • toxic sugar bait
  • vectorial capacity
  • viral infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Microbiology

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