Information Seeking Behaviors and Intentions in Response to Environmental Health Risk Messages: A Test of A Reduced Risk Information Seeking Model

Shelly R. Hovick, Elisabeth Bigsby, Sam R. Wilson, Sarah Thomas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study tests the effects of environmental health risk messages on perceived risk, information needs and decisions to seek information, testing a reduced risk information seeking and processing model (R-RISP). Participants (N = 1,823) were randomized to one of three risk conditions (arsenic, bisphenol A [BPA] or volatile organic compounds [VOCs]) and one of the three message conditions (high threat, low threat or no message); participants in the high and low threat message conditions were also randomly assigned to a seeking cue to action condition (with or without seeking cue). Overall, the results support the R-RISP model, demonstrating the importance of current knowledge perceptions and informational subjective norms in information acquisition decisions. In addition, the results also provide initial evidence that environmental health risk messages can prompt information seeking and increase intentions to seek information in the future. Avenues for future research are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalHealth communication
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Communication

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