Information flow analysis on the lunar mars life support test project

Luis F. Rodriguez, Brian J. Sauser, Kuan Chong Ting

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

Metric analysis of research activity and technology development has become one of the deciding factors in whether or not the research of potential technologies receives the needed funding or a technology is incorporated into a system. It is difficult to accurately predict the configuration of an ALS system that will transport humans to the surface of Mars and support surface exploration. Determining which ALS research activities will support this effort is a very discretionary process, and there simply is not enough information to accurately make these types of decisions. Requirements change as research develops, and it is very difficult to create a metric that can accurately assess a potential or ongoing research project. The SSM team of the NJ-NSCORT has developed an internet platform to perform the assessment of potential technologies for the purpose of the development of an ALS system. The platform is called IFA and it has completed validation with current NJ-NSCORT projects. Further validation of the IFA is needed using systems more representative of the configurations expected to be employed in future ALS systems. To perform this validation, data from the LMLSTP, at JSC, was input into the IFA. The LMLSTP data provided a more characteristic view of the needs of an ALS system. By utilizing this information, it was expected that the utility of the IFA methodology could be demonstrated, and valuable information regarding the state of ALS research could be derived.

Original languageEnglish (US)
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 1999
Event29th International Conference on Environmental Systems - Denver, CO, United States
Duration: Jul 12 1999Jul 15 1999

Other

Other29th International Conference on Environmental Systems
CountryUnited States
CityDenver, CO
Period7/12/997/15/99

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Automotive Engineering
  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality
  • Pollution
  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

Cite this

Rodriguez, L. F., Sauser, B. J., & Ting, K. C. (1999). Information flow analysis on the lunar mars life support test project. Paper presented at 29th International Conference on Environmental Systems, Denver, CO, United States. https://doi.org/10.4271/1999-01-2046

Information flow analysis on the lunar mars life support test project. / Rodriguez, Luis F.; Sauser, Brian J.; Ting, Kuan Chong.

1999. Paper presented at 29th International Conference on Environmental Systems, Denver, CO, United States.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Rodriguez, LF, Sauser, BJ & Ting, KC 1999, 'Information flow analysis on the lunar mars life support test project' Paper presented at 29th International Conference on Environmental Systems, Denver, CO, United States, 7/12/99 - 7/15/99, . https://doi.org/10.4271/1999-01-2046
Rodriguez LF, Sauser BJ, Ting KC. Information flow analysis on the lunar mars life support test project. 1999. Paper presented at 29th International Conference on Environmental Systems, Denver, CO, United States. https://doi.org/10.4271/1999-01-2046
Rodriguez, Luis F. ; Sauser, Brian J. ; Ting, Kuan Chong. / Information flow analysis on the lunar mars life support test project. Paper presented at 29th International Conference on Environmental Systems, Denver, CO, United States.
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