Information extraction during instrument flight: an evaluation of the validity of the eye-mind hypothesis

Julianne Fox, David Merwin, Roger Marsh, George McConkie, Arthur Kramer

Research output: Contribution to journalConference articlepeer-review

Abstract

A study was performed to determine the extent to which flight-relevant information on instruments peripheral to fixation is extracted and used during fixed-wing instrument flight. Twenty student and twenty instructor pilots flew a series of missions in a fixed-wing flight simulator which was interfaced with an eye-tracker. In one mission flight-relevant information was removed from instruments peripheral to fixation while in the other mission peripheral information was intact. Pilots' performance was degraded and eye scan strategies were modified when peripheral information was removed. Furthermore, in several situations instructor pilots' performance was more adversely influenced by the removal of peripheral information than was student pilots' performance. The data are discussed in terms of attentional strategies during flight.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)77-81
Number of pages5
JournalProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
Volume1
StatePublished - Jan 1 1996
EventProceedings of the 1996 40th Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. Part 1 (of 2) - Philadelphia, PA, USA
Duration: Sep 2 1996Sep 6 1996

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

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