Informal Caregiving Networks and Use of Formal Services by Inner-City African American Elderly With Dementia

Hong Li, Dorothy Edwards, Nancy Morrow-Howell

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Informal caregiving networks are the primary source of support for elderly persons with Alzheimer's disease and other types of dementia. The authors studied a group of 200 urban African American elderly persons with dementia, the characteristics of their informal caregiving networks, and patterns of formal service use to examine relationships between informal caregiving networks and formal service use. Multiple logistic regression analysis indicated that elderly persons were less likely to use formal services when caregivers in the informal networks were more capable of making care-related decisions. In addition, elderly person's functional status, annual income, and Medicaid eligibility were also significantly related to their use of formal services. Practice implications of these findings are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)55-62
Number of pages8
JournalFamilies in Society
Volume85
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2004

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

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