Influence of turbulence and in-stream structures on the transport and survival of grass carp eggs and larvae at various developmental stages

Andres F. Prada, Amy E. George, Benjamin H. Stahlschmidt, Patrick Ryan Jackson, Duane C. Chapman, Rafael O. Tinoco

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Understanding the response of grass carp to flow and turbulence regimes during early life stages is fundamental to monitoring and controlling their spread. A comprehensive set of hydrodynamic experiments was conducted with live grass carp eggs and larvae, to better understand their drifting and swimming patterns with 3 different in-stream obstructions: (1) a gravel bump, (2) a single cylinder, and (3) submerged vegetation. The hydrodynamic behavior of eggs and larvae with each obstruction was continuously monitored for about 85 consecutive hours. Transient spatial distributions of the locations of eggs and larvae throughout the water column were generated for each flow scenario. Results show that the active swimming capabilities of larvae allow them to seek areas of low turbulence and low shear stresses, and that eggs are susceptible to damage by high levels of turbulence, which was further corroborated with tests in an oscillating grid-stirred turbulence tank. Our study seeks to better inform field collection of grass carp during early life stages, and to guide the design of alternative approaches to control the dispersal of this invasive species in North America.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number16
JournalAquatic Sciences
Volume82
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2020

Keywords

  • Grass carp
  • Mortality
  • Swimming behavior
  • Transport of eggs and larvae
  • Turbulence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Aquatic Science
  • Ecology
  • Water Science and Technology

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