Inferences and confidence in warning texts: The role of age and prior knowledge

Anne E. Adams, Wendy A. Rogers, Arthur D. Fisk

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Understanding warnings is important, regardless if prior knowledge with respect to such information exists. The goal of the current study was to investigate younger and older adults' ability to draw inferences under different conditions of prior knowledge, and how confident participants were about their decisions. Participants read two-sentence text passages, which either resembled real warnings (real) or were the opposite of real warnings (reversed). Participants evaluated whether information in a given statement was consistent (true) or inconsistent (false) with information given in a text passage. Statements either repeated information explicitly or implied in the text passage. Participants also rated their confidence in the correctness of their answer. Data showed no age-related differences in accuracy when the text passages resembled real warnings. When text passages were reversed, older adults were less accurate than younger adults, yet more confident when inferences were required.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication51st Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2007
Pages25-29
Number of pages5
StatePublished - Dec 1 2007
Externally publishedYes
Event51st Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2007 - Baltimore, MD, United States
Duration: Oct 1 2007Oct 5 2007

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
Volume1
ISSN (Print)1071-1813

Other

Other51st Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2007
CountryUnited States
CityBaltimore, MD
Period10/1/0710/5/07

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

Cite this

Adams, A. E., Rogers, W. A., & Fisk, A. D. (2007). Inferences and confidence in warning texts: The role of age and prior knowledge. In 51st Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2007 (pp. 25-29). (Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society; Vol. 1).