Abstract

We have performed scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM/STS) measurements as well as ab initio calculations for graphene monolayers on clean and hydrogen(H)-passivated silicon (100) (Si(100)/H) surfaces. In order to experimentally study the same graphene piece on both substrates, we develop a method to depassivate hydrogen from under graphene monolayers on the Si(100)/H surface. Our work represents the first demonstration of successful and reproducible depassivation of hydrogen from beneath monolayer graphene flakes on Si(100)/H by electron-stimulated desorption. Ab initio simulations combined with STS taken before and after hydrogen desorption demonstrate that graphene interacts differently with the clean and H-passivated Si(100) surfaces. The Si(100)/H surface does not perturb the electronic properties of graphene, whereas the interaction between the clean Si(100) surface and graphene changes the electronic states of graphene significantly. This effect results from the covalent bonding between C and surface Si atoms, modifying the π-orbital network of the graphene layer. The local density of states shows that the bonded C and Si surface states are highly disturbed near the Fermi energy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2735-2742
Number of pages8
JournalNano Letters
Volume11
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 13 2011

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Graphite
Silicon
Graphene
graphene
silicon
Substrates
electronics
Hydrogen
Monolayers
hydrogen
Desorption
desorption
space transportation system
flakes
Surface states
Electronic states
Scanning tunneling microscopy
Fermi level
Electronic properties
scanning tunneling microscopy

Keywords

  • DFT
  • electron-stimulated desorption
  • Graphene
  • scanning tunneling microscopy
  • Silicon

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Bioengineering
  • Chemistry(all)
  • Materials Science(all)
  • Mechanical Engineering

Cite this

Xu, Y., He, K. T., Schmucker, S. W., Guo, Z., Koepke, J. C., Wood, J. D., ... Aluru, N. R. (2011). Inducing electronic changes in graphene through silicon (100) substrate modification. Nano Letters, 11(7), 2735-2742. https://doi.org/10.1021/nl201022t

Inducing electronic changes in graphene through silicon (100) substrate modification. / Xu, Y.; He, K. T.; Schmucker, S. W.; Guo, Z.; Koepke, J. C.; Wood, J. D.; Lyding, Joseph W; Aluru, Narayana R.

In: Nano Letters, Vol. 11, No. 7, 13.07.2011, p. 2735-2742.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Xu, Y, He, KT, Schmucker, SW, Guo, Z, Koepke, JC, Wood, JD, Lyding, JW & Aluru, NR 2011, 'Inducing electronic changes in graphene through silicon (100) substrate modification', Nano Letters, vol. 11, no. 7, pp. 2735-2742. https://doi.org/10.1021/nl201022t
Xu Y, He KT, Schmucker SW, Guo Z, Koepke JC, Wood JD et al. Inducing electronic changes in graphene through silicon (100) substrate modification. Nano Letters. 2011 Jul 13;11(7):2735-2742. https://doi.org/10.1021/nl201022t
Xu, Y. ; He, K. T. ; Schmucker, S. W. ; Guo, Z. ; Koepke, J. C. ; Wood, J. D. ; Lyding, Joseph W ; Aluru, Narayana R. / Inducing electronic changes in graphene through silicon (100) substrate modification. In: Nano Letters. 2011 ; Vol. 11, No. 7. pp. 2735-2742.
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