Improving the parental self-agency of depressed Latino immigrant mothers: Piloted intervention results

Lissette Piedra, Soo Jung Byoun, Luciana Guardini, Valerie Cintrón

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Segmented assimilation theory posits that uneven rates of intergenerational acculturation-the process by which immigrants and their children learn the language and normative lifestyles of a new culture-can be detrimental to the parent-child relationship. This paper presents results on parental self-efficacy from an intervention study-Vida Alegre [Happy/Contented Life]-for depressed immigrant mothers that includes a three-session module based on Gottman & DeClaire (2001) concept of emotional bidding. Using a mixed-methods design, this study examines whether exposure to the intervention increased parental self-efficacy. Outcome data from the Parenting Self-Agency Measure (PSAM) administered at three points in time-pre-test, post-test, and 3. months follow-up-was analyzed using the Wilcoxon Signed-Ranks Test. Constant comparative analysis was used to code 3 focus groups and 10 post-treatment interviews. Results indicate a significant increase in parental self-efficacy between pre-test and post-test. An analysis of mixed methods results further highlights the importance of tailoring interventions to help immigrant parents reinterpret their child's communications to strengthen family relationships.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)126-135
Number of pages10
JournalChildren and Youth Services Review
Volume34
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012

Fingerprint

Self Efficacy
Hispanic Americans
immigrant
Mothers
self-efficacy
Parent-Child Relations
Child Language
Acculturation
Family Relations
Parenting
Nonparametric Statistics
Focus Groups
Life Style
Parents
Communication
parent-child relationship
Interviews
acculturation
assimilation
communications

Keywords

  • Cognitive behavioral intervention
  • Immigrant mothers
  • Intervention research
  • Mixed methods
  • Parenting self-efficacy
  • Segmented assimilation theory

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Improving the parental self-agency of depressed Latino immigrant mothers : Piloted intervention results. / Piedra, Lissette; Byoun, Soo Jung; Guardini, Luciana; Cintrón, Valerie.

In: Children and Youth Services Review, Vol. 34, No. 1, 01.01.2012, p. 126-135.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Piedra, Lissette ; Byoun, Soo Jung ; Guardini, Luciana ; Cintrón, Valerie. / Improving the parental self-agency of depressed Latino immigrant mothers : Piloted intervention results. In: Children and Youth Services Review. 2012 ; Vol. 34, No. 1. pp. 126-135.
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