Impaired Practitioners. Psychologists' Opinions About Prevalence, and Proposals for Intervention

BARBARA J. WOOD, STEVEN KLEIN, HERBERT J. CROSS, CHARLES J. LAMMERS, JERRY K. ELLIOTT

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Licensed psychologists were surveyed about opinions toward "impaired practitioners." Academicians and practitioners (N = 167) were sampled. Results suggested (a) a significant proportion of psychologists were judged to be impaired; (b) the majority of respondents believed that impaired practitioners are a serious problem; (c) few psychologists were willing to refer impaired colleagues to a therapist or report them to a regulatory agency; (d) training in ethics was related to awareness, seeking help, offering help, and reporting colleagues to a regulatory agency; and (e) respondents overwhelmingly favored the least restrictive proposals for intervention. Implications for training and prevention are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)843-850
Number of pages8
JournalProfessional Psychology: Research and Practice
Volume16
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 1985

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

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