Impacts of diaspora travel on ethnic identity development among 1.5 generation Korean-American college students

Jungeun Kim, Monika Stodolska

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This research project was designed to explore the impacts of the most recent trip to Korea on ethnic identity development among 1.5 generation Korean-American college students. The study employed 18 in-depth semi-structured interviews with Korean-American college students at a major university in the Midwest, USA. The data collection was conducted between December 2010 and February 2011. The findings of the study revealed that Korean-American college students exhibited different levels of ethnic identity prior to their most recent trip to Korea and described themselves as either Koreans, Korean-Americans, or Americans. Travel to Korea played important roles in (re)developing their ethnic identity. Those who identified themselves as Korean prior to the trip either confirmed their ethnic identity or changed their identity to Korean-American. Those who considered themselves Korean-American retained their ethnic identity, while those who thought of themselves as American altered their identity to Korean as a result of the travel.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)187-207
Number of pages21
JournalJournal of Tourism and Cultural Change
Volume11
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013

Keywords

  • 1.5 generation
  • College student
  • Diaspora tourism
  • Ethnic identity development
  • Korean-American

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Cultural Studies
  • Transportation
  • Tourism, Leisure and Hospitality Management
  • Nature and Landscape Conservation

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