Impact of nanostructure research on conventional solid-state electronics: The giant isotope effect in hydrogen desorption and CMOS lifetime

K. Hess, L. F. Register, B. Tuttle, J. Lyding, I. C. Kizilyalli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A theory of desorption of silicon-hydrogen/deuterium bonds and of depassivation of the silicon-oxide interface of CMOS integrate circuits is presented. First, the physics of two competing depassivation mechanisms and the hydrogen/deuterium isotope effect for each are discussed in the light of recent STM and MOS device studies. A phenomenological model of depassivation in MOS devices based on STM data then is presented that addresses the potential significance of these competing desorption mechanisms and their respective isotope effects on device reliability and lifetime. Finally, initial work to develop a more rigorous, first-principles theory of desorption is described. In the process it is demonstrated that experimental and theoretical methods of nanostructure physics have a direct relevance to conventional silicon-based integrated circuit technology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-7
Number of pages7
JournalPhysica E: Low-Dimensional Systems and Nanostructures
Volume3
Issue number1-3
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 16 1998

Keywords

  • Density functional theory for condensed matter
  • Hydrogen passivation of defects
  • Semiconductor-oxide interfaces
  • Solid state transistors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Condensed Matter Physics

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