Impact of elevated ozone concentration on growth, physiology, and yield of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.): A meta-analysis

Zhaozhong Feng, Kazuhiko Kobayashi, Elizabeth A. Ainsworth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We quantitatively evaluated the effects of elevated concentration of ozone (O3) on growth, leaf chemistry, gas exchange, grain yield, and grain quality relative to carbon-filtered air (CF) by means of meta-analysis of published data. Our database consisted of 53 peer-reviewed studies published between 1980 and 2007, taking into account wheat type, O3 fumigation method, rooting environment, O3 concentration ([O3]), developmental stage, and additional treatments such as drought and elevated carbon dioxide concentration ([CO2]). The results suggested that elevated [O3] decreased wheat grain yield by 29% (CI: 24-34%) and aboveground biomass by 18% (CI: 13-24%), where CI is the 95% confidence interval. Even in studies where the [O3] range was between 31 and 59 ppb (average 43 ppb), there was a significant decrease in the grain yield (18%) and biomass (16%) relative to CF. Despite the increase in the grain protein content (6.8%), elevated [O3] significantly decreased the grain protein yield (-18%). Relative to CF, elevated [O3] significantly decreased photosynthetic rates (-20%), Rubisco activity (-19%), stomatal conductance (-22%), and chlorophyll content (-40%). For the whole plant, rising [O3] induced a larger decrease in belowground (-27%) biomass than in aboveground (-18%) biomass. There was no significant response difference between spring wheat and winter wheat. Wheat grown in the field showed larger decreases in leaf photosynthesis parameters than wheat grown in < 5L pots. Open-top chamber fumigation induced a larger reduction than indoor growth chambers, when plants were exposed to elevated [O3]. The detrimental effect was progressively greater as the average daily [O3] increased, with very few exceptions. The impact of O3 increased with developmental stages, with the largest detrimental impact during grain filling. Both drought and elevated [CO3] significantly ameliorated the detrimental effects of elevated [O3], which could be explained by a significant decrease in O3 uptake resulting from decreased stomatal conductance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2696-2708
Number of pages13
JournalGlobal change biology
Volume14
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 29 2008

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Ozone
Physiology
meta-analysis
physiology
wheat
ozone
Biomass
Fumigation
fumigation
stomatal conductance
Carbon
developmental stage
Drought
carbon
air
drought
Air
open-top chamber
protein
Ribulose-Bisphosphate Carboxylase

Keywords

  • Air pollution
  • Atmospheric change
  • Biomass
  • Elevated [CO]
  • Global change
  • Grain quality
  • Ozone
  • Photosynthesis
  • Stomata
  • Yield component

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Global and Planetary Change
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Ecology
  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

Impact of elevated ozone concentration on growth, physiology, and yield of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) : A meta-analysis. / Feng, Zhaozhong; Kobayashi, Kazuhiko; Ainsworth, Elizabeth A.

In: Global change biology, Vol. 14, No. 11, 29.10.2008, p. 2696-2708.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "We quantitatively evaluated the effects of elevated concentration of ozone (O3) on growth, leaf chemistry, gas exchange, grain yield, and grain quality relative to carbon-filtered air (CF) by means of meta-analysis of published data. Our database consisted of 53 peer-reviewed studies published between 1980 and 2007, taking into account wheat type, O3 fumigation method, rooting environment, O3 concentration ([O3]), developmental stage, and additional treatments such as drought and elevated carbon dioxide concentration ([CO2]). The results suggested that elevated [O3] decreased wheat grain yield by 29{\%} (CI: 24-34{\%}) and aboveground biomass by 18{\%} (CI: 13-24{\%}), where CI is the 95{\%} confidence interval. Even in studies where the [O3] range was between 31 and 59 ppb (average 43 ppb), there was a significant decrease in the grain yield (18{\%}) and biomass (16{\%}) relative to CF. Despite the increase in the grain protein content (6.8{\%}), elevated [O3] significantly decreased the grain protein yield (-18{\%}). Relative to CF, elevated [O3] significantly decreased photosynthetic rates (-20{\%}), Rubisco activity (-19{\%}), stomatal conductance (-22{\%}), and chlorophyll content (-40{\%}). For the whole plant, rising [O3] induced a larger decrease in belowground (-27{\%}) biomass than in aboveground (-18{\%}) biomass. There was no significant response difference between spring wheat and winter wheat. Wheat grown in the field showed larger decreases in leaf photosynthesis parameters than wheat grown in < 5L pots. Open-top chamber fumigation induced a larger reduction than indoor growth chambers, when plants were exposed to elevated [O3]. The detrimental effect was progressively greater as the average daily [O3] increased, with very few exceptions. The impact of O3 increased with developmental stages, with the largest detrimental impact during grain filling. Both drought and elevated [CO3] significantly ameliorated the detrimental effects of elevated [O3], which could be explained by a significant decrease in O3 uptake resulting from decreased stomatal conductance.",
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