Impact of beef and beef product intake on cognition in children and young adults: A systematic review

Ruopeng An, Sharon M. Nickols-Richardson, Naiman Khan, Jianxiu Liu, Ruidong Liu, Caitlin Clarke

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

(1) Background: Undernutrition and micronutrient deficiency have been consistently linked to cognitive impairment among children and young adults. As a primary source of dietary animal protein, beef consumption holds the potential to improve diet quality and positively influence cognitive function. This study systematically reviewed evidence linking beef intake to cognition among children and young adults. (2) Methods: A literature search was conducted in seven electronic bibliographic databases for studies assessing the impact of beef consumption on cognition. (3) Results: We identified eight studies reporting results from five unique interventions. Two interventions were conducted in Kenya, two in the U.S. and one in four countries including Guatemala, Pakistan, Democratic Republic of the Congo and Zambia. Only one intervention employed a non-feeding control arm and found beef consumption to improve cognitive abilities compared to the control. However, the other interventions comparing beef consumption to other food types found no consistent result. (4) Conclusions: Evidence pertaining to the impact of beef consumption on cognition remains limited due to the small and heterogeneous set of studies. Future research should adopt a population representative sample and longer follow-up period, employ a non-feeding control arm and comprehensively measure nutrient intakes among study participants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number1797
JournalNutrients
Volume11
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2019

Fingerprint

systematic review
young adults
cognition
Cognition
Young Adult
beef
Bibliographic Databases
Guatemala
animal source protein
Zambia
Democratic Republic of the Congo
Food
Aptitude
Dietary Proteins
Micronutrients
Kenya
Pakistan
nutritional adequacy
nutrient intake
Malnutrition

Keywords

  • Beef
  • Child
  • Cognition
  • Review
  • Young adult

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Impact of beef and beef product intake on cognition in children and young adults : A systematic review. / An, Ruopeng; Nickols-Richardson, Sharon M.; Khan, Naiman; Liu, Jianxiu; Liu, Ruidong; Clarke, Caitlin.

In: Nutrients, Vol. 11, No. 8, 1797, 08.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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