Impact of a brief intervention on self-regulation, self-efficacy and physical activity in older adults with type 2 diabetes

Erin A. Olson, Edward McAuley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Despite evidence of the benefits of physical activity, most individuals with type 2 diabetes do not meet physical activity recommendations. The purpose of this study was to test the efficacy of a brief intervention targeting self-efficacy and self-regulation to increase physical activity in older adults with type 2 diabetes. Older adults (Mage = 61.8 ± 6.4) with type 2 diabetes or metabolic syndrome were randomized into a titrated physical activity intervention (n = 58) or an online health education course (n = 58). The intervention included walking exercise and theory-based group workshops. Self-efficacy, self-regulation and physical activity were assessed at baseline, post-intervention, and a follow-up. Results indicated a group by time effect for self-regulation [F(2,88) = 14.021, p < .001, η2 = .24] and self-efficacy [F(12,77) = 2.322, p < .05, η2 = .266] with increases in the intervention group. The intervention resulted in short-term increases in physical activity (d = .76, p < .01), which were partially maintained at the 6-month follow-up (d = .35, p < .01). The intervention increased short-term physical activity but was not successful at maintaining increases in physical activity. Similar intervention effects were observed in self-efficacy and self-regulation. Future research warrants adjusting intervention strategies to increase long-term change.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)886-898
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Behavioral Medicine
Volume38
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2015

Fingerprint

Self Efficacy
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Health Education
Walking
Education
Self-Control

Keywords

  • Diabetes
  • Older adults
  • Physical activity
  • Self-efficacy
  • Self-regulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Impact of a brief intervention on self-regulation, self-efficacy and physical activity in older adults with type 2 diabetes. / Olson, Erin A.; McAuley, Edward.

In: Journal of Behavioral Medicine, Vol. 38, No. 6, 01.12.2015, p. 886-898.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{6e21c2f2ce194bbf91e59289fe672c3f,
title = "Impact of a brief intervention on self-regulation, self-efficacy and physical activity in older adults with type 2 diabetes",
abstract = "Despite evidence of the benefits of physical activity, most individuals with type 2 diabetes do not meet physical activity recommendations. The purpose of this study was to test the efficacy of a brief intervention targeting self-efficacy and self-regulation to increase physical activity in older adults with type 2 diabetes. Older adults (Mage = 61.8 ± 6.4) with type 2 diabetes or metabolic syndrome were randomized into a titrated physical activity intervention (n = 58) or an online health education course (n = 58). The intervention included walking exercise and theory-based group workshops. Self-efficacy, self-regulation and physical activity were assessed at baseline, post-intervention, and a follow-up. Results indicated a group by time effect for self-regulation [F(2,88) = 14.021, p < .001, η2 = .24] and self-efficacy [F(12,77) = 2.322, p < .05, η2 = .266] with increases in the intervention group. The intervention resulted in short-term increases in physical activity (d = .76, p < .01), which were partially maintained at the 6-month follow-up (d = .35, p < .01). The intervention increased short-term physical activity but was not successful at maintaining increases in physical activity. Similar intervention effects were observed in self-efficacy and self-regulation. Future research warrants adjusting intervention strategies to increase long-term change.",
keywords = "Diabetes, Older adults, Physical activity, Self-efficacy, Self-regulation",
author = "Olson, {Erin A.} and Edward McAuley",
year = "2015",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s10865-015-9660-3",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "38",
pages = "886--898",
journal = "Journal of Behavioral Medicine",
issn = "0160-7715",
publisher = "Springer New York",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Impact of a brief intervention on self-regulation, self-efficacy and physical activity in older adults with type 2 diabetes

AU - Olson, Erin A.

AU - McAuley, Edward

PY - 2015/12/1

Y1 - 2015/12/1

N2 - Despite evidence of the benefits of physical activity, most individuals with type 2 diabetes do not meet physical activity recommendations. The purpose of this study was to test the efficacy of a brief intervention targeting self-efficacy and self-regulation to increase physical activity in older adults with type 2 diabetes. Older adults (Mage = 61.8 ± 6.4) with type 2 diabetes or metabolic syndrome were randomized into a titrated physical activity intervention (n = 58) or an online health education course (n = 58). The intervention included walking exercise and theory-based group workshops. Self-efficacy, self-regulation and physical activity were assessed at baseline, post-intervention, and a follow-up. Results indicated a group by time effect for self-regulation [F(2,88) = 14.021, p < .001, η2 = .24] and self-efficacy [F(12,77) = 2.322, p < .05, η2 = .266] with increases in the intervention group. The intervention resulted in short-term increases in physical activity (d = .76, p < .01), which were partially maintained at the 6-month follow-up (d = .35, p < .01). The intervention increased short-term physical activity but was not successful at maintaining increases in physical activity. Similar intervention effects were observed in self-efficacy and self-regulation. Future research warrants adjusting intervention strategies to increase long-term change.

AB - Despite evidence of the benefits of physical activity, most individuals with type 2 diabetes do not meet physical activity recommendations. The purpose of this study was to test the efficacy of a brief intervention targeting self-efficacy and self-regulation to increase physical activity in older adults with type 2 diabetes. Older adults (Mage = 61.8 ± 6.4) with type 2 diabetes or metabolic syndrome were randomized into a titrated physical activity intervention (n = 58) or an online health education course (n = 58). The intervention included walking exercise and theory-based group workshops. Self-efficacy, self-regulation and physical activity were assessed at baseline, post-intervention, and a follow-up. Results indicated a group by time effect for self-regulation [F(2,88) = 14.021, p < .001, η2 = .24] and self-efficacy [F(12,77) = 2.322, p < .05, η2 = .266] with increases in the intervention group. The intervention resulted in short-term increases in physical activity (d = .76, p < .01), which were partially maintained at the 6-month follow-up (d = .35, p < .01). The intervention increased short-term physical activity but was not successful at maintaining increases in physical activity. Similar intervention effects were observed in self-efficacy and self-regulation. Future research warrants adjusting intervention strategies to increase long-term change.

KW - Diabetes

KW - Older adults

KW - Physical activity

KW - Self-efficacy

KW - Self-regulation

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84945551976&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84945551976&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s10865-015-9660-3

DO - 10.1007/s10865-015-9660-3

M3 - Article

C2 - 26162648

AN - SCOPUS:84945551976

VL - 38

SP - 886

EP - 898

JO - Journal of Behavioral Medicine

JF - Journal of Behavioral Medicine

SN - 0160-7715

IS - 6

ER -