Imaginative language: What event-related potentials have revealed about the nature and source of concreteness effects

Hsu Wen Huang, Kara D. Federmeier

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Behavioral and neuropsychological evidence suggest that abstract and concrete concepts may be represented, retrieved, and processed differently in the human brain. As reviewed in this paper, data using event-related potential measures, some in combination with visual half-field presentation methods, have offered a detailed picture of the nature and source of concreteness effects. In particular, the results provide strong evidence for multiple mechanisms underlying the behavioral processing differences that have long been noted for concrete and abstract words and, further, suggest an intriguing, unique role for the right hemisphere in associating words with sensory imagery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)503-515
Number of pages13
JournalLanguage and Linguistics
Volume16
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

Fingerprint

event
language
evidence
brain
Concreteness
Event-related Potentials
Language
Imagery
Visual Half-field
Right Hemisphere

Keywords

  • Concreteness effects
  • Event-related potentials
  • Frontal imagery effects
  • Laterality
  • N400

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language

Cite this

Imaginative language : What event-related potentials have revealed about the nature and source of concreteness effects. / Huang, Hsu Wen; Federmeier, Kara D.

In: Language and Linguistics, Vol. 16, No. 4, 01.01.2015, p. 503-515.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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