Image reconstruction in photoacoustic tomography with truncated cylindrical measurement apertures

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is an inherently three-dimensional imaging technique with great potential for a wide range of biomedical imaging applications. In certain applications such as imaging of small animals or human limbs, it is natural to employ a measurement geometry in which the photoacoustic data are recorded on a cylindrical aperture. Analytic PAT reconstruction formulas are available for infinite cylindrical apertures, which are obviously not experimentally realizable. In this work, we investigate data sufficiency conditions and iterative reconstruction algorithms for exact image reconstruction in PAT assuming various truncated cylindrical measurement apertures. We employ known results regarding singularity detection in PAT to achieve this. Three-dimensional computer-simulation studies are conducted to corroborate the theoretical conjectures.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
DOIs
StatePublished - May 8 2006
Externally publishedYes
Event7th Conference on Biomedical Thermoacoustics, Optoacoustics, and Acousto-optics - Photons Plus Ultrasound: Imaging and Sensing 2006 - San Jose, CA, United States
Duration: Jan 22 2006Jan 26 2006

Publication series

NameProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
Volume6086
ISSN (Print)0277-786X

Conference

Conference7th Conference on Biomedical Thermoacoustics, Optoacoustics, and Acousto-optics - Photons Plus Ultrasound: Imaging and Sensing 2006
CountryUnited States
CitySan Jose, CA
Period1/22/061/26/06

Keywords

  • Cylindrical measurement apertures
  • Image reconstruction
  • Photoacoustic tomography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Condensed Matter Physics

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