Ignoring perfect knowledge in-the-world for imperfect knowledge in-the-head: Implications of rational analysis for interface design

W. D. Gray, Wai-Tat Fu

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperpeer-review

Abstract

Memory can be internal or external - knowledge in-the-world or knowledge in-the-head. Making needed information available in an interface may seem the perfect alternative to relying on imperfect memory. However, the rational analysis framework (Anderson, 1990) suggests that least-effort tradeoffs may lead to imperfect performance even when perfect knowledge in-the-world is readily available. The implications of rational analysis for interactive behavior are investigated in two experiments. In experiment 1 we varied the perceptual-motor effort of accessing knowledge in-the-world as well as the cognitive effort of retrieving items from memory. In experiment 2 we replicated one of the experiment 1 conditions to collect eye movement data. The results suggest that milliseconds matter. Least-effort tradeoffs are adopted even when the absolute difference in effort between a perceptual-motor versus a memory strategy is small, and even when adopting a memory strategy results in a higher error rate and lower performance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages112-119
Number of pages8
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001
Externally publishedYes
EventConference on Human Factors in Computing Systems CHI 2001 Anyone. Anywhere - Seattle, WA, United States
Duration: Mar 31 2001Apr 5 2001

Other

OtherConference on Human Factors in Computing Systems CHI 2001 Anyone. Anywhere
CountryUnited States
CitySeattle, WA
Period3/31/014/5/01

Keywords

  • Cognitive least-effort
  • Direct-manipulation interfaces
  • Errors
  • Eye movements
  • Eye tracking
  • Interactive behavior
  • Interface design
  • Rational analysis
  • Satisficing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Software
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Ignoring perfect knowledge in-the-world for imperfect knowledge in-the-head: Implications of rational analysis for interface design'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this