Ideological Conflict and Prejudice: An Adversarial Collaboration Examining Correlates and Ideological (A)Symmetries

Chadly Stern, Jarret T. Crawford

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In an adversarial collaboration, we examined associations among factors that could link ideological conflict—perceiving that members of a group do not share one’s ideology—to prejudice and affiliation interest. We also examined whether these factors would possess similar (“symmetrical”) or different (“asymmetrical”) associative strength among liberals and conservatives. Across three samples (666 undergraduate students, 347 Mechanical Turk workers), ideological conflict was associated with perceived dissimilarity on political and nonpolitical topics, as well as negative emotions. Perceived political and nonpolitical dissimilarity were also associated with negative emotions, prejudice, and lower affiliative intentions among both liberals and conservatives. Importantly, however, perceived political dissimilarity was associated with negative emotions, prejudice, and lower affiliative intentions more strongly among liberals. Some inconsistent evidence also suggested that perceived nonpolitical dissimilarity was associated with prejudice and lower affiliative intentions more strongly among conservatives. These findings document nuance in relationships that could link ideological conflict to prejudice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)42-53
Number of pages12
JournalSocial Psychological and Personality Science
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2021

Keywords

  • ideological asymmetry
  • ideological conflict
  • ideological symmetry
  • prejudice

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Ideological Conflict and Prejudice: An Adversarial Collaboration Examining Correlates and Ideological (A)Symmetries'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this