Identifying predictors of levator veli palatini muscle contraction during speech using dynamic magnetic resonance imaging

Eshan Pua Schleif, Catherine M. Pelland, Charles Ellis, Xiangming Fang, Stephen J. Leierer, Bradley P. Sutton, David P. Kuehn, Silvia S. Blemker, Jamie L. Perry

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify predictors of levator veli palatini (LVP) muscle shortening and maximum contraction velocity in adults with normal anatomy. Method: Twenty-two Caucasian English-speaking adults with normal speech and resonance were recruited. Participants included 11 men and 11 women (M = 22.8 years, SD = 4.1) with normal anatomy. Static magnetic resonance images were obtained using a three-dimensional static imaging protocol. Midsagittal and oblique coronal planes were established for visualization of the velum and LVP muscle at rest. Dynamic magnetic resonance images were obtained in the oblique coronal plane during production of “ansa.” Amira 6.0.1 Visualization and Volume Modeling Software and MATLAB were used to analyze images and calculate LVP shortening and maximum contraction velocity. Results: Significant predictors ( p < .05) of maximum LVP shortening during velopharyngeal closure included mean extravelar length, LVP origin-to-origin distance, velar thickness, pharyngeal depth, and velopharyngeal ratio. Significant predictors ( p < .05) of maximum contraction velocity during velopharyngeal closure included mean extravelar length, intravelar length, LVP origin-to-origin distance, and velar thickness. Conclusions: This study identified six velopharyngeal variables that predict LVP muscle function during real-time speech. These predictors should be considered among children and individuals with repaired cleft palate in future studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1726-1735
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research
Volume63
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Speech and Hearing

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Identifying predictors of levator veli palatini muscle contraction during speech using dynamic magnetic resonance imaging'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this