Human factors and ergonomic science in the courts: Expert testimony in the dispute resolution process

Robert V. Redding, Wendy A. Rogers, Arthur D. Fisk

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The science of human factors and ergonomics (HF/E) contributes to the dispute resolution process in many ways. HF/E analysis can provide insights into product liability issues, vehicular accidents, industrial accidents, and more. The field is increasingly being recognized by lawyers as a means to help jurors and judges understand why events may have occurred; for example, why someone would use a product or drive a vehicle in a seemingly unsafe manner. Often, probable causes relate to design-induced or system-induced error. To understand the litigation influence of HF/E, we analyzed cases involving HF/E experts. Our findings revealed that: (1) HF/E science is well recognized in the judicial system; (2) competent HF/E experts are viewed as contributing to litigated matters; (3) individuals without HF/E training and experience will not be recognized as HF/E experts; and (4) admissibility demands that the intellectual rigor used for court must be consistent with other discipline-related work.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 50th Annual Meeting, HFES 2006
PublisherHuman Factors and Ergonomics Society Inc.
Pages865-869
Number of pages5
ISBN (Print)9780945289296
DOIs
StatePublished - 2006
Externally publishedYes
Event50th Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2006 - San Francisco, CA, United States
Duration: Oct 16 2006Oct 20 2006

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
ISSN (Print)1071-1813

Other

Other50th Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2006
CountryUnited States
CitySan Francisco, CA
Period10/16/0610/20/06

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

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